On social media, social distancing & the value of human contact…

I created my first social media profile on LinkedIn because it sounded like a good idea to help land a professional job. It launched about the same time that I graduated undergrad and I thought it would be a good way to network professionally with people that I didn’t know and that would likely findContinue reading “On social media, social distancing & the value of human contact…”

On how corporate responsibility is not a PR ploy…

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is not public relations! Yes, I am screaming this as a professional in the field. It’s important for me to clarify this point, (yes, I am yelling). I often feel that people believe that the practice of promoting a company or a product is somehow deceitful or seeking to balance badContinue reading “On how corporate responsibility is not a PR ploy…”

On accepting the consequences of free speech…

I began my debating career when I was in seventh grade. The resolution at the time was whether or not free speech was applicable to hate speech. In competition, like all debates, I had to argue both sides. I memorized the first amendment word by word. In my research I weighed the views and accusationsContinue reading “On accepting the consequences of free speech…”

On my hostility toward the lack of Latino-owned media companies…

This week I read a two-page case study about the importance of women and minority owned media companies. This case study was omitted in the updated version of my current textbook. In the case study, for reasons I don’t understand, Latinos weren’t even mentioned as consumers or owners. I’m going to stop here to screamContinue reading “On my hostility toward the lack of Latino-owned media companies…”

On counting on a 2020 Census app to narrow the digital divide…

The 2020 Census is entering the digital age for many reasons. First, it is more sustainable – no more paper. Then there is this idea that more people will participate because it will be digital and easier to access. The information gathered can be processed in real time and thus will be more efficient and,Continue reading “On counting on a 2020 Census app to narrow the digital divide…”

On how being online used to be fun…

I remember getting my first email account in college and learning how to change the text color. I remember the fight for computer labs to work on class assignments and requesting the proctor to throw off people playing solitaire or visiting non-school assignment related websites. I also had a beeper in college and knew theContinue reading “On how being online used to be fun…”

On the affordance of convenience…

The internet can do a lot of things and it’s accessed everywhere. It’s found on our computers, tablets, phones, TV, cars, watches, and even exercise equipment! And, as if constant access to information, news, and entertainment isn’t enough to distract and disrupt, there are countless apps that offer us structured mechanisms for activities and toContinue reading “On the affordance of convenience…”

On Neo-Luddism, Chomsky, and a wish for public libraries…

In one of my very first college classes in 1995, I studied Neo-Luddism—the belief that the use of technology has serious ethical, moral, and social ramifications. It was of great interest on campus at the time, as email was emerging, laptop computers were more affordable and began replacing word processors (and typewriters), and the InternetContinue reading “On Neo-Luddism, Chomsky, and a wish for public libraries…”

On discerning muckrakers, fake news, and click bait

I first learned about muckrakers and yellow journalism when I read Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle in middle school.  The book, about the exploited lives of immigrants in Chicago, exposed horrifying working conditions in the meat-packing industry. I was taught that his book was a form of muckraking; a term used in the Progressive Era toContinue reading “On discerning muckrakers, fake news, and click bait”